Self-Publishing a Go Go

Self-Publishing a Go Go

Yes, I’m still humming and hawing over this. Self-publishing versus mainstream, which should I choose? Could I get a book deal? Is it worth my while? Do I have the time and energy to handle all the levels of insanity of self-publishing?

I don’t know, honestly. At one point, I’d have given anything to see my work in print. Nowadays, I take a more pragmatic view of it – I’d rather make a ton of money, thanks, and be a real author. There’s always Lulu.com if I want a dead tree version of something I wrote.

So. I think I will begin an experiment.

I have lots of ideas, due to my having an excessive amount of imagination. One of these ideas is a weird story about Christmas in the best tradition of cutesy holiday movies everywhere, which came about during a late-night episode of insomnia when I got to thinking about how I’d write such a story. It doesn’t have much of a plot – they never do, really – but it’s got talking animals and magic, and I figure I can just wing it with that.

One chapter at a time, written up and posted here on my site. No edits allowed. Once it’s up, it doesn’t get changed unless I’m fixing typos. I’m going to aim for a chapter a week, but it might be longer than that during NaNoWriMo. And when it’s done, I’ll wrap the whole thing up, proof it, edit it, and self-publish it on Amazon within a month. I’ll do everything myself, even the cover, just to see if I can and if it’s a viable business strategy.

In the meantime, I’ll edit the Novel and prepare to pitch it at agents and the mainstream press.

This is going to be one hell of a ride, but I think I’m up to the challenge. Thoughts? Opinions? Declarations of my chronic insanity? Tell me in the comments.

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3 comments on “Self-Publishing a Go GoAdd yours →

  1. If you self publish first, then it has to be as good as you can possibly make it, as your sales figures for this novel will affect your pitch to agents and editors. You have to put everything into it, as though self-publishing will be your only outlet, because after you self publish, you’re no longer a debut author and you have a track record.

    1. Which leaves us in a slight conundrum: don’t self-publish, and chase the mainstream deal while keeping your ‘debut author’ status, or self-publish and build an audience and revenue right away?

      To be honest, the deal that most debut genre writers get isn’t good enough to hold off on self-pubbing a book. The hit that you’ll take for having a track record is still less than the revenue and audience you can build, all else being equal, and a publisher would be a fool to turn down a marketable, sellable work just because the author already has another work out elsewhere.

  2. I think its an awesome idea! Ambitious. Could be fun, could be work. If you do it, I will be there reading every bit of it. Cant promise I won’t laugh at your typos, though.

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